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What Is A Heat Pump?

A diagram that answers the question: what is a heat pump?Did you know that furnaces and air conditioners are not the only machines that can regulate the temperature of your home? In fact, there’s a device that heats and cools, and it’s three to four times more energy efficient than an electric heater! What’s this miracle machine, you ask? The heat pump, of course!

What is a Heat Pump?

Many Americans have never heard of this technology and may be wondering: what is a heat pump? A heat pump uses electricity to transfer heat to cold spaces, and cool air to warm spaces. In the summer, heat pumps transfer hot air out of your home. In the winter, heat pumps extract heat from the air, ground, or water, and transfer it into your home. Heat pumps tend to use less energy than furnaces and air conditioners because they simply transfer heat instead of creating it.

Heat pumps are a great alternative to air conditioners, and can be used in place of furnaces in temperate climates. However, people who live in cold climates like Minnesota should use a heat pump in conjunction with their furnace in the winter. Using a heat pump and furnace in the winter ensures that warm air is distributed consistently throughout your home. That means no more cold rooms or drafty areas. Using a heat pump in tandem with an electric furnace can also cut your electricity use by as much as 40%.

There are several different types of heat pumps available for residential use. Continue reading to discover which type of heat pump is best for you and your home.

Air Source Heat Pump

Air source heat pumps are the most common and affordable type of heat pump. They transfer heat between your house and the outside air. Air source heat pumps are great for summertime use because they’re more effective at dehumidifying than traditional air conditioners. However, their efficiency declines as temperatures approach zero. This means that people who live in cold climates should not depend on air source heat pumps as their only source of heat. The Trane Xli heat pump is the air source heat pump that I recommend to customers due to its superior energy efficiency and reliability

Ductless Heat Pump

Ductless heat pumps, also known as mini-split heat pumps, are essentially air source heat pumps for people who don’t have duct work in their home, or who need to heat or cool a single room or area of their home. Ductless heat pumps can have as many as four indoor air handling units connected to the outdoor unit. Each indoor air handling unit has its own thermostat, so you can set different areas of your home to different temperatures for optimal flexibility, comfort, and efficiency.

Absorption Heat Pump

Absorption heat pumps also transfer heat between your home and the air outside. However, they are powered by natural gas, propane, or heated water instead of electricity. For this reason, they are sometimes referred to as gas-fired heat pumps.

Geothermal Heat Pump

Geothermal heat pumps, also known as ground source heat pumps, are extremely energy efficient and have low operating costs. They are an eco-friendly heating solution because they draw heat from the ground or groundwater, which stays a relatively constant temperature all year round (like a cave). The drawback of geothermal heat pumps is that they are expensive to install, because they require drilling about 30 feet into the ground.

To learn more about heat pumps and which type is best for your home, contact the experienced heat pump professionals at the Ray N. Welter Heating Company

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What Is A Heat Pump?

A diagram that answers the question: what is a heat pump?Did you know that furnaces and air conditioners are not the only machines that can regulate the temperature of your home? In fact, there’s a device that heats and cools, and it’s three to four times more energy efficient than an electric heater! What’s this miracle machine, you ask? The heat pump, of course!

What is a Heat Pump?

Many Americans have never heard of this technology and may be wondering: what is a heat pump? A heat pump uses electricity to transfer heat to cold spaces, and cool air to warm spaces. In the summer, heat pumps transfer hot air out of your home. In the winter, heat pumps extract heat from the air, ground, or water, and transfer it into your home. Heat pumps tend to use less energy than furnaces and air conditioners because they simply transfer heat instead of creating it.

Heat pumps are a great alternative to air conditioners, and can be used in place of furnaces in temperate climates. However, people who live in cold climates like Minnesota should use a heat pump in conjunction with their furnace in the winter. Using a heat pump and furnace in the winter ensures that warm air is distributed consistently throughout your home. That means no more cold rooms or drafty areas. Using a heat pump in tandem with an electric furnace can also cut your electricity use by as much as 40%.

There are several different types of heat pumps available for residential use. Continue reading to discover which type of heat pump is best for you and your home.

Air Source Heat Pump

Air source heat pumps are the most common and affordable type of heat pump. They transfer heat between your house and the outside air. Air source heat pumps are great for summertime use because they’re more effective at dehumidifying than traditional air conditioners. However, their efficiency declines as temperatures approach zero. This means that people who live in cold climates should not depend on air source heat pumps as their only source of heat. The Trane Xli heat pump is the air source heat pump that I recommend to customers due to its superior energy efficiency and reliability

Ductless Heat Pump

Ductless heat pumps, also known as mini-split heat pumps, are essentially air source heat pumps for people who don’t have duct work in their home, or who need to heat or cool a single room or area of their home. Ductless heat pumps can have as many as four indoor air handling units connected to the outdoor unit. Each indoor air handling unit has its own thermostat, so you can set different areas of your home to different temperatures for optimal flexibility, comfort, and efficiency.

Absorption Heat Pump

Absorption heat pumps also transfer heat between your home and the air outside. However, they are powered by natural gas, propane, or heated water instead of electricity. For this reason, they are sometimes referred to as gas-fired heat pumps.

Geothermal Heat Pump

Geothermal heat pumps, also known as ground source heat pumps, are extremely energy efficient and have low operating costs. They are an eco-friendly heating solution because they draw heat from the ground or groundwater, which stays a relatively constant temperature all year round (like a cave). The drawback of geothermal heat pumps is that they are expensive to install, because they require drilling about 30 feet into the ground.

To learn more about heat pumps and which type is best for your home, contact the experienced heat pump professionals at the Ray N. Welter Heating Company

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